Compile Scrivener books into Asciidoc

By on July 14, 2014 - Geekery, News Tags: ,

My favorite writing tool is Scrivener. I wrote the Learning MCollective book for O’Reilly Media entirely in Scrivener. I was afraid this wouldn’t work very well, but it ended up working just great.

To do this, I created a Scrivener compile format which set up chapter headings correctly with a link target above them as recommended. Then I wrote some scripts to process the output from Scrivener compile to make AsciiDoc in the flavor that O’Reilly wanted.

I have released my Scrivener compile settings and scripts so that others can use them should they want to produce asciidoc from Scrivener. They are open source under an Apache license at https://github.com/jorhett/scrivener-asciidoc.

What I want from an Android keyboard

By on June 29, 2014 - Opinion

So I find myself forever frustrated by Android keyboards1. I never accepted a soft keyboard until (a) nobody made hard keyboard devices any more and (b) Swype became popular. I love Swype, and found myself using it even more than the physical keyboard on the last android phone which had one.

However, the implementations of Swype (or Glide or whatever each vendor calls it) have gone rapidly downhill in one way: they no longer believe the keyboard user. Apparently most people only vaguely get near the letters they need — so autopredict has gone into overdrive, always assuming the letters pressed have no relevance to the word desired2.

This doesn’t work for me.

I am very accurate with my entry. I watch my finger hit dead center on each key I want to use… and then observe that the word I entered isn’t on screen, nor in the suggestions. This is deeply frustrating. When I enter “ale” I mean the alcoholic drink. I cannot fathom why it enters “are” when my finger traced all the way to the “L”, and “ale” doesn’t even appear in the suggestions. Likewise when I try “wait” I get “wake”. My finger never approached the “E”.

Worse yet that even when I spell out the words letter by letter, many of these keyboards will replace my carefully poked out word with another, and give me zero option to revert the change. I’ve had to learn to hit two spaces, then go back and poke out my word in between the spaces so that it won’t invoke the “fixxer”.

And worst of all, almost every autocorrection is grammatically incorrect. So it’s not like the logic is better–it’s worse.

I want something very simple. I want auto-correction, but I want the keyboard to defer to and prefer what I actually typed. Suggest other words, but stop removing my perfectly valid word and replacing it with something grammatically incorrect.

1 While I am a Mac user and lover, IOS doesn’t work for me. I don’t think that way. Every time I am forced to use an IOS device I can’t find my way in or out of anything. So I’m a Mac-using Android advocate.

2 And yes, even recent versions of the paid Swype keyboard do this.

How technology improves our fail

By on June 26, 2014 - Opinion Tags:

When I try to use my phone in a natural and effective manner, how it knows so much better than me what I need. How it shows me the better path of disconnection and confusion. Nothing is better than backing up and retyping a word time and time again. My exact and correct spelling is so much less entertaining than the nonsense words my phone would prefer to send.
Read More »

Updated ActiveMQ 5.9.1-2 RPM with REST APIs

By on June 13, 2014 - Geekery, News Tags: ,

As previously reported in my ActiveMQ 5.9.1 RPM post, I’ve created an RPM for Active 5.9.1 on RHEL/CentOS that matches the one published on the Puppet Labs EL6 dependencies repository.

I discovered last night that I hadn’t included the new REST apis in the image. So there is now a new version. I’ve bumped the release version so that you can upgrade if you installed the previous version.
Read More »